Professional Development Seminars 2016-2017


Click the plus sign to read more about each seminar.

The Treatment and Triumphs in Understanding ADHD and ASD

April 27, 2017

In this introductory lecture, Jennie Goldstein will explain the biological story behind ADHD, explore how it impacts on the lives of patients and their families, and clarify how it is diagnosed. The role of medication will be described. With this knowledge base, therapists will be prepared to  offer their clients research-based information, empathic understanding, and genuine optimism, as clients build a plan to help themselves or their children reach their potential within the context of ADHD.

For more information

Presented by:
 Jennie Goldstein, M.D.

May 4, 2017

This lecture will address the challenges and differences in diagnosis and treatment of High Functioning Autism Disorder (HFA). Therapists will learn to identify HFA and better recognize how its symptomology could be confused with ADD and other mood disorders. The impact on treatment modalities, interventions, and therapeutic goals will be explored. In addition, the difficulty of interpersonal relationships and challenges for clients who are either diagnosed with HFA or their spouses and families will be discussed. Please note that this is part one of a two part lecture series.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dvorah Klein, LCSW-C

May 11, 2017

This lecture will focus on working with couples when one or more of the couple is challenged with ADD and or HFA. When couples present themselves for therapy, therapists may misunderstand that what they are observing in their client, is fact, undiagnosed ADD and or HFA. In this lecture, differential diagnosis, treatment options, and interventions will be discussed with this very highly challenging and complex issue.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dvorah Klein, LCSW-C

May 18, 2017

This lecture will focus on the unique challenges facing a neurologist when considering a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD. Specifically, in children one must exclude forms of non-convulsive Epilepsy, such as Petit Mal and Complex Partial Seizures. In adults, forms of depression, as well Dementia/Alzheimer’s Disease must be born in mind. Emphasis will be placed on important caveats in history taking, and neurologic examination. Diagnostic tools will be discussed, including TOVA and MOXO tests as well as various old and new therapeutic agents, emphasizing common and uncommon side effects that are too often overlooked by physicians. Questions from the audience will be warmly received.

For more information

Presented by:
 Moshe Dickman, M.D.

May 25, 2017

In this lecture, Shmuel Harris will look at the clinical manifestations and challenges of ADD specifically in an adult population. ADD was traditionally conceptualized as a child and adolescent disorder however, evidence over the past decade has rapidly increased awareness of ADD in adults, and new clinical practice has emerged across the world. The goal of this lecture is to give therapists a greater appreciation of the clinical presentation and treatment of ADD in this population, in order that they may better identify, treat, and work together with prescribing physicians in their care of adult clients suffering with this disorder.

For more information

Presented by:
 Shmuel Harris, M.D.

Click the plus sign to read more about each seminar.

The Many Faces of Trauma: A Clinical Overview

February 2, 2017

This session will introduce participants to the stress-trauma continuum; learn to distinguish between posttraumatic distress, ASD (Acute Stress Disorder) and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Emphasis will be on psychological first aid, how to help ourselves, and others who have been exposed to acute, and single event trauma.

For more information

Presented by:
 Naomi Baum, Ph.D.

February 9, 2017

This session will examine trajectories of resilience, post traumatic growth, and distinguish between them. Individual, familial and community factors that influence both will be discussed. Programs that focus on building resilience in various communities and professional groups will be discussed.

For more information

Presented by:
 Naomi Baum, Ph.D.

February 16, 2017

Differentiating between “Big T”, universally recognized trauma experiences versus “small t”, individually experienced traumatic experiences. This lecture will enable therapists to conceptualize how and why various experiences impact on individuals in different ways that directly impact on therapeutic assessment and interventions.

For more information

Presented by:
 Stacey Leibowitz-Levy, Ph.D.

February 23, 2017

Childhood sexual abuse is a gross and significant violation of the human spirit. Crossing the sacred space of one’s own personal boundary, profoundly interrupts a child’s development and erodes their sense of trust, closeness, touch, and connection. Coming from the perspective of a child, there is an inability to comprehend the confusing disturbance that arrives from an insidious imbalance of power. Silence and shame breeds denial, which overtakes reason and the capacity to speak the truth goes underground. When victims of sexual abuse reach adulthood, they struggle with intimate relationships, feelings of self-worth, safety and not believing they are deserving of love and happiness. Many, who have repressed their memories, are not certain where their feelings of lowliness come from. Therapy may be the first time they are able to peel away the protective layers of denial and face their personal, abusive narrative.

For more information

Presented by:
 Joan Kristall, LCSW-C

March 2, 2017

Silence and isolation breeds shame and hopelessness in the hearts of survivors of sexual abuse. In the safe, trusting, and nurturing environment of therapy, individuals, who have endured this horrific trauma can begin the process of healing and wholeness. As clinicians, we need to listen, believe, and respond in ways that can help build and mend the intense damage that was perpetrated. The power of our compassionate presence can offer a therapeutic relationship that is not tainted with shameful connection. Working with adult survivor’s calls upon us in the mental health community to expand our clinical repertoire to address the whole person, in mind, body, senses, and spirit. We need to be expansive in the ways we invite clients to express themselves.

For more information

Presented by:
 Joan Kristall, LCSW-C

Previous Lectures from our 2016-2017 Professional Development Seminars

Click the plus sign to read more about each seminar.

Clinical Issues of a Woman's Life Cycle

November 3, 2016

What is normal adolescence “sexual” interest, exploration, play, curiosity? How can professionals and parents support “normal” development, positive interest, curiosity, and attitudes towards their teenage child’s bodies? Where do problems arise? What are the warning signs that all is not ok?
This presentation will discuss the clinical implications related to assessments and interventions at this stage of development. How much, and what kind of education about “safe touch” and “your body belongs to you” is helpful? What are the gender identity issues that arise at this age?

For more information

Presented by:
 Dr. Yocheved Debow

November 10, 2016

What are the developmental issues that arise at this stage of psychosocial and physical development? As clinicians, how do we understand appropriate developmental struggles vs. behavior and attitudes that require professional interventions? Who is the client? The parent or the adolescent? How do we help families navigate the religious and social conflicts that arise at this developmental stage? This presentation will explore the clinical implications and interventions at this stage of development.

For more information

Presented by:
 Caryn Green

November 17, 2016

What happens when a parent does a chronically poor job at tuning in to a child’s feelings? What happens if the parent him or herself never learned how to process emotion, or is too busy with her own agenda to attend to the child’s experience? This lecture will examine the different ways in which children are neglected emotionally, even by ostensibly “good” parents, and explore the long-term effects of tuned-out parenting on young adult women.

For more information

Presented by:
 Sharon Slater

November 24, 2016

1 in 6 couples go through a fertility related challenge. There are over 35 thousand IVF cycles done in Israel a year. 25% of pregnancies end in miscarriage in the first trimester. These are major events in a woman’s and a couple’s emotional and physical life. Low self worth, body betrayal, isolation, anger, resentment are some of the feelings that one experiences when faced with a fertility challenge. This presentation will explore the different difficulties that arise and the tools for working with and helping individuals and couples cope better along this journey according to the model developed in Merkaz Panim, an organization  dedicated to providing holistic emotional support to those struggling with the challenges of fertility.

For more information

Presented by:
 Rachi Hain, BSW

December 1, 2016

As a woman approaches the end of her childbearing years, she is often confronted with fear, the urge to be “something” else and the need to create new purpose in life. This is a major transitional time in a woman’s life.
Many women spend most of their adult years focusing on children and home life. When children begin to reach older adolescence and young adulthood, move out and marry, women are forced to redefine their identity and purpose. It is a time in a women’s life when the challenges of biological, emotional, social, and psychological vulnerabilities interface in dramatic ways. Ending childbearing, beginning menopause, watching children grow into adults and leaving home are just some of the transitions that women face at this stage. In addition, as a woman begins to evaluate her life’s accomplishments and disappointments as well as her marriage, she often experiences a phenomenon of “grey divorce”. Marriages that have been stressed over the years, and are no longer buffeted by children begin to fall apart. As the physiology of aging begins to take hold and define her body, and medication begins to be routine in her life clinical issues arise in a way they had not in past years. It is a time of dramatic transition.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dr. Chana Katan

December 8, 2016

Early on, we all had a vision of what we wanted our lives to be. Sometimes, our vision became our reality and, often times, life’s unpredictable curve ball surprises threw us on a completely, unexpected track. We can take advantage of the gift of longevity and offer our clients and ourselves an opportunity to engage in a life review, assessing our significant milestones and our deep regrets. In the 3rd act of life, typically in one’s 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and beyond, we can reconstruct our life mission and wake up to creating a more purposeful reality. Reflecting on the wisdom of rich experiences, we can utilize age as potential and shift our perspective of what might be possible.

For more information

Presented by:
 Joan Kristall, LCSW-C

Click the plus sign to read more about each seminar.

Understanding & Integrating DBT

January 5, 2017

Originally developed for suicidal and self-harming women with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder, Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has grown and evolved to address a range of diagnoses and clinical problems. In this opening lecture we will discuss the diagnoses, dimensional criteria and clinical presentations of clients who are appropriate for a DBT treatment framework, while also relating to the issue of risk and its assessment in these complex patients. The objective of this lecture is to give therapists a good understanding of which clients are appropriate for a DBT approach, and some basic tools to assess their level of risk.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dr. Shmuel Harris

January 12, 2017

Having identified who is appropriate for a DBT framework, the following two lectures will give an overview of the four modules of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and their clinical application to complex clients. In the first presentation, an overview of the therapy will be discussed, and the principles and technique of DBT will be explained. The second lecture will focus on explaining the four modules of DBT and specific DBT skills. The objective of these two lectures is to familiarize therapists with the DBT framework and how it can be applied to appropriate clients.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dr. Tzachi Fried

January 19, 2017

Having identified who is appropriate for a DBT framework, the following two lectures will give an overview of the four modules of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and their clinical application to complex clients. In the first presentation, an overview of the therapy will be discussed, and the principles and technique of DBT will be explained. The second lecture will focus on explaining the four modules of DBT and specific DBT skills. The objective of these two lectures is to familiarize therapists with the DBT framework and how it can be applied to appropriate clients.

For more information

Presented by:
 Dr. Tzachi Fried

January 26, 2017

Complex clients require a consistent and integrated treatment approach in order to improve clinical outcomes. In this fourth lecture, we will focus on how the individual therapist can case manage their clients who are also doing group therapy, while also serving as the central liaison with their client’s support network, including family members and/or teachers. We will show how facilitating close cooperation between all of these parties is crucial in empowering clients to integrate these new skills into their daily life and improve their clinical outcome.

For more information

Presented by:
 Tzachi Fried, Ph.D.